Infant Optics DXR-5 Baby Monitor Review— Basic But Worthwhile?

As a video monitor, the Infant Optics DXR-5 is very basic and provides only the simplest of features, but its comes with some cute accessories. Its tagline is “Simple and reliable. A monitor for all.” That first part is accurate, though the second part might not be quite as on point.

The Infant Optics DXR-5 model currently sells for $83 on Amazon. The DXR-5 is the predecessor to the DXR-8 model, which is very different from this one (but also about twice the price). This system can host a total of four cameras.

Setup

The DXR-5 comes with nine separate pieces, which seems a bit excessive for such a simple camera. The package includes screws for mounting and a camera stand hidden under the tray (the tray has a small sticker alerting users to the hidden accessory).

The first camera comes already paired with the parent unit, but any additional units will need to be paired (a simple process with directions in the User’s Guide). The battery for the parent unit is easily installed under a door behind the clip/stand and our model came partially charged.

There is zero pan/tilt or zoom functionality through the parent unit. All camera movement must be done manually. That means upon setup users will need to spend a little extra time getting the camera perfectly situated before first use.

Testing Notes

Though the camera requires manual adjustment to get into the perfect place, it can swivel in every direction from its base. In addition, in order to help increase the motion range of this camera, the manufacturers have included a small camera tray that helps give it a deeper tilting angle while sitting on a shelf.

The child unit displays two sets of lights in the dark: the red circle of infrared lights around the camera and the bright green power light on the base. These lights don’t seem bright enough to bother any sleeping babies, but they’re bright enough when you’re looking for the unit in the dark to make any necessary adjustments.

The parent unit seems a good bit bigger than it needs to be, but the bottom portion houses the speaker in the front and a large battery in the back. The larger housing also allows for plenty of room for the clip/stand to function in this dual mode and makes the video screen a bit easier to see.

In general, it’s just a bit bulkier than I would prefer, and the antenna does not fold down. All that said, I appreciate the design aesthetic and use of color, which is different from most other drab color schemes on monitor systems.

The parent unit displays three sets of lights — green for power, blue for signal (which flashes when the signal is interrupted), and red for charging. There are no lights to visually signal any noise. In addition to the wrist strap, the parent unit comes with a belt clip that also converts into a stand to keep the unit upright. This little clip/stand is actually one of my favorite features of the child unit.

The battery was difficult to test due to the lack of battery display on the parent unit. The manufacturer claims between 6 and 12 hours of battery time – it’s likely that the 6 hours is for a constant video stream, and 12 hours is for VOX mode.

VOX mode is a voice activation mode that allows the monitor unit to switch into sleep mode, turning off the screen until the child unit detects noise. This is great for parents who are trying to sleep and it also helps the unit to conserve power. The sensitivity to sound can be adjusted, and the mode can be turned off altogether to allow the screen to stay on constantly.

The product description notes that both devices should be placed at least 3 feet away from other 2.4GHz or Wi-Fi enabled devices for optimum performance. The manufacturer description includes a 150-foot indoor range and 800-foot outdoor reception range. I never had any dropped signal issues with this unit.

Other than the video feed, the parent unit displays no information other than which camera the user is viewing. Not having a battery indicator is very frustrating and it requires users to be vigilant about either plugging in the parent unit frequently or keeping it plugged in while in use.

Security

The Infant Optics DXR 5 operates on a 2.4GHz band, and the company claims it offers 100 percent privacy and security.

Who It Might Be A Good Fit For

  • Users whose children sleep in a crib or bassinet
  • Users who are very mobile while their child is sleeping
  • Users looking for an affordable monitor that is reliable

Who It Might Not Be A Good Fit For

  • Users who need to have greater control over the movement of the camera 
  • Users who need the camera on at all times 
  • Users looking for a more established brand name
  • Users who can’t charge the parent unit on a regular basis

Conclusion

For the price, the Infant Optics DXR-5 is a pretty good system, but it doesn’t come with any bells or whistles. The battery life isn’t the greatest (and the indicator is non-existant). It seems to be fairly reliable, however, and when it comes to your little ones, that is the most important feature.

Gabe Turner

Gabe Turner

Gabe Turner is an attorney and journalist with a passion for home tech and secure, efficient living. Since graduating from NYU Law, he has maintained a paradoxical existence of trying to live life adventurously while remaining staunchly risk-averse. He is torn by the dual desires of wanting to only be in Brooklyn writing about housing policy and smart home tech and aspiring to visit his friends scattered across the globe. Gabe believes that stable, safe communities are the cornerstone to a vibrant and healthy society, and it is this passion that brought him to contribute to Security Baron.

Leave a Comment

Trending News

Follow Us

Reviews