Nine months after Equifax’s massive data breach was first revealed, information about the now-infamous cybersecurity incident is still leaking out to the public — it turns out thousands of customers had their passport details hacked, too.

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Equifax sent a letter to “several” U.S. congressional committees revealing the additional details, Reuters reports. The credit monitoring firm gave specific information on driver’s licenses which were hacked — 38,000 were uploaded to the breached portal. Details on 3,200 passports were included in the breach, as well.

The firm also confirmed the numbers on information which has already been reported — about 146.6 million names, 146.6 million birthdates, 145.5 million social security numbers, 99 million addresses (or at least partial address information) and 209,000 payment card numbers with expiration dates were stolen in the breach.

So while no new customers were affected beyond what we already knew — and no further breach notifications will likely be sent out — the concrete numbers, especially in regards to driver’s licenses and passports, are new. Whether that will be the end of things is hard to say.

What Comes Next?

So with several congressional committees interested in the ongoing details of Equifax’s breach, we’re wondering if anything will come of it. Will there, eventually, be federal legislation that can aid consumers (and crackdown on companies) in some way?

Because when it comes to companies policing their own cybersecurity systems in a post-Equifax world, early signs are not promising. A recent report revealed that thousands of companies are still using the vulnerable versions of the software which got Equifax into trouble in the first place.

It’s unclear how many companies are ignorant to these details, but arguably, it might be even worse if companies are aware of the problems and have yet to make the correct adjustments to use secure software.

Equifax shareholders also voted to re-elect its board of directors earlier this month, as noted by the Wall Street Journal.

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