Whole Foods has announced that it is currently investigating unauthorized access of payment card information at some of its stores, marking the latest incident within a string of high-profile security breaches at major companies.

Whole Foods

The supermarket chain claims the breach only occurred within certain venues of its stores, “such as taprooms and full table-service restaurants.” Not all Whole Foods locations have those features.

Taprooms and full table-service restaurants also use a different point of sale system than the company’s grocery checkout system. Whole Foods says “payment cards used at the primary store checkout systems were not affected.”

Whole Foods did not release any information regarding when the breach may have taken place, or how many customers were affected. The company said it launched an investigation and contacted authorities upon learning about the breach, but it also encourages customers to monitor payment card statements for unauthorized charges.

The supermarket chain was recently acquired by Amazon in a deal that was announced this June. Whole Foods pointed out that its breach had nothing to do with Amazon, and that no Amazon.com customers would be affected, in case there was any confusion in that regard.

Whole Foods’ announcement of its breach comes in the same week that major accounting firm Deloitte announced a cybersecurity breach. In that breach, a number of large companies were hit by a “sophisticated hack” compromising emails and other possible information.

Of course, both breaches pale in comparison to the Equifax breach from earlier this month. That hack may have affected every American adult consumer with credit.

Whole Foods says it will announce additional updates as it learns more about the breach. As for now, details are fairly scarce.

While large companies like Whole Foods are vulnerable to attention from hackers, they’re not the only businesses in danger. Check out our article Four Common Cybersecurity Myths for more information.

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