The Best Password Managers of 2019

When it comes to selecting a password manager, it can be hard to know what’s up and down. What should you look for in a password manager, and what brands can you really trust? In this review, I picked out the best password managers of 2019 whether you’re an iPhone, Android, Mac, or Windows user, a family, or just an individual user. Let’s get started!

Best Overall Password Manager
Keeper
Keeper
Keeper

With awesome app ratings, a dark web scan, and incredibly low prices, Keeper is a great password manager for business or personal use. 

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Best Password Manager for Families
Sticky Password
Sticky Password
Sticky Password

No matter your family size, you can store all of your passwords in one vault forever for only $149.99, which will save you a ton in the long run. 

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Best Password Manager for Macs
Password Boss
Password Boss
Password Boss

Mac-users will have an easy time navigating Password Boss as its app on the Apple store has a 4.5 rating. Password Boss also boasts two-factor authentication, multi-factor authentication on iOS, and really awesome customer support. 

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Best Password Manager for Androids
LastPass
LastPass
LastPass

With an app rated 4.6 on the Google Play store, Android users will appreciate LastPass for its many features including a dark web scan and free credit monitoring for U.S addresses. 

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Best Password Manager for iPhones
RoboForm
RoboForm
RoboForm

With an Apple store rating of 4.8, iPhone users will love RoboForm for its two-factor authentication, multi-factor authentication, and its excellent customer support include live chat. 

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Best Overall Password Manager

Keeper Password Audit. Photo provided by Keeper.

Keeper

Whether you’re an iPhone, Android, or Windows user, Keeper is a great all-around option. On top of keeping track of your passwords and form information, as any password manager does, it also offers multi-factor authentication and a dark web scan to make sure your credentials aren’t floating around where they shouldn’t be. Plus, my experience importing my passwords into Keeper was by far the easiest of any of the password managers that I’ve tested. Just one click, and all my passwords were synced across all my devices. You can’t get much better than that! 

To learn more, read our full review of Keeper. 

Get Best Offer
Keeper
Keeper
Keeper

With a dark web scan, multi-factor authentication, and cloud and local storage, Keeper is an awesome password manager option. 

Best Password Manager for Families

Sticky Password Dashboard

Sticky Password

Most password managers offer monthly or yearly subscriptions, but Sticky Password isn’t like other password managers. Rather, it offers both a free version and a lifetime version for only $149.99. Now, this may seem like a lot of money to spend at once, but when you do the math, it could pay for itself in a few years. Just a flat rate and all of your passwords will be stored across all of your devices for life— to some, that could make more sense than spending $48 for a year of the service. 

Sticky Password is also a great option for the privacy-concerned. The company is based in the Czech Republic, a non-member to the Five Eyes, Nine Eyes, and 14 Eyes international surveillance alliances. That means that they’ll never be forced to hand over consumer data. Plus, as a country, the Czech Republic prohibits privacy interference for everything but hate speech, Holocaust denial, child pornography, or racist content. Basically, with Sticky Password, you can rest assured that your families’ credentials are safe in their encrypted vault. 

To learn more, read our full review of Sticky Password. 

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Sticky Password
Sticky Password
Sticky Password

Sticky Password lets you store an unlimited amount of passwords across all your devices, so you never have to forget a password again. 

Best Password Manager for Macs

Password Boss Dashboard

Password Boss

Especially if you’re a Mac user, Password Boss is a fantastic option, with a iPhone app rating of 4.5. But let’s not forget the manager itself, which lets you store an unlimited number of passwords across all of your devices. Plus, whether you use Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Opera, or Internet Explorer, you’ll be able to import passwords from your browser, saving you time.

Password Boss’ most expensive plans only cost four dollars per user per month, which isn’t going to break the bank. If you’re feeling especially frugal, they also have a free option that can store passwords on one device. Pretty, pretty, pretty good! 

Want to learn more? Read our full review of Password Boss. 

Get Best Offer
Password Boss
Password Boss
Password Boss

We appreciate Password Boss for its dark web scan, unlimited storage, and reasonable prices, including a free trial.  

Best Password Manager for Androids

LastPass Vault

LastPass

Used by two million people every single day, LastPass is one of my personal favorite password managers. It’s one of the few to offer credit monitoring completely free, plus a dark web scan through PasswordPing. It also has two and even multi-factor authentication, increasing your account security. Android users will like LastPass in particular due to its high app rating of 4.6, but it’s also not a bad choice for iPhone users, as that app has a 4.3 rating.

LastPass is available for a free 30-day trial, perfect if you want to test it out. Individual plans cost  only $36 a year, which breaks down to three dollars a month. There’s also a $48 annual family plan that covers up to six users. There’s really no downside when you’re an Android user with LastPass. 

Want more information? Read our full review of LastPass. 

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LastPass
LastPass
LastPass

LastPass offers a dark web scan, free credit monitoring, and a highly-rated app. 

Best Password Manager for iPhones

RoboForm Dashboard

RoboForm

Used by everyone from individuals to small businesses to Fortune 500 companies, iPhone users will especially appreciate RoboForm. Not only does its app in the Apple store have a nearly-perfect 4.8 rating, but it also offers multi-factor authentication through face or fingerprint ID. That’s going to make sure that the right person is accessing your accounts (namely, you). But don’t worry— if you forget your master password, an emergency contact can let you into your vault. Did I mention there’s a free version available? 

To learn more, read our full review of RoboForm. 

Get Best Offer
RoboForm
RoboForm
RoboForm

Store an unlimited amount of passwords on RoboForm, which also features form filling and multi-factor authentication. 

The Best Password Manager for Windows

Enpass Dashboard

Enpass

Windows-users should all be bowing down to Enpass. Not only does their Windows app have a four-star rating, which is really high compared to its competitors on Windows, but they also offer a ton of great features like a dark web scan and an inbox scan. You’ll also be able to access two or multi-factor authentication, depending on your device.

But Enpass isn’t just a great option for Windows users. It’s also one of the best password managers for privacy that I’ve reviewed. The company is based in India, a non-member to those international surveillance alliances I mentioned above. Plus, they have a really strict data-logging policy and will not keep any location or device information. Of course, the data in your vault will be encrypted using AES-256, the industry standard.

To learn more, read my full review of Enpass. 

Password Manager Methodology

Okay, you’ve heard my recommendations, but if you want to learn more, I’d love to tell you a little about my methodology. In English? I’ll tell you how to pick a password manager that’s user-friendly, secure, and affordable. Let’s get started. 

Privacy

lastpass-password-manager-review
LogMeIn Privacy Policy. Screenshot from LastPass website.

Now, your password manager’s vault doesn’t only hold all of your usernames and passwords. It also holds your payment information in the form of a digital wallet, and any secure notes that you want to keep safe. So if privacy is a priority for you, I’d read closely.

The first thing you’ll want to look at is where a company is based. If it’s based in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.K, the U.S, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Norway, Germany, Belgium, Italy, Sweden, or Spain, then you’ll be under the jurisdiction of the Five Eyes, Nine Eyes, or 14 Eyes international surveillance alliances. Under certain circumstances, companies based in these countries can be forced to hand over consumer data. Good to know, right?

The next thing you’ll want to check out is the company’s data-logging policy. After all, if they don’t save any of your data, there’s nothing to hand over. Most if not all companies will share your basic account information like your name and payment info. Some companies take it a step further, saving things like your device type, operating system, the location where you logged on, and more.

All of the password managers that I’ve seen do not log the data in your vault, however; that will remain encrypted and visible to your eyes only. Make sure your data is being encrypted in AES-256, the current industry standard. Most password managers will also have PBKDF2 to avoid password cracking.

If you are particularly concerned about privacy, make sure you choose a password manager that is based in a non-member country to Five Eyes, Nine Eyes, and 14 Eyes. You should also read their privacy policy closely to make sure that they’re keeping as little of your data as possible. But for most people, as long as your vault is encrypted, the password manager is a go.

Features

Now let’s talk about what you should be looking for in the password manager itself. Of course, the main object of your password manager is to sync an unlimited number of your passwords across an unlimited number of devices. Most password managers also offer auto-fill for forms.

I prefer password managers that let you import your passwords directly from browsers rather than making you enter each one in individually. Make sure that the password manager you choose lets you import from the browser you use before purchasing. From there, a good password manager will give you an audit of your passwords, letting you know which ones are weak, old, or repeated. Password generators, standard for password managers, will create long, complicated passwords for you to up your cyber security game. Now, some password managers even change your old passwords automatically or change multiple passwords at once, but this is pretty rare.

There are a few other features that I prefer to have in a password manager. Ideally, a password manager has an emergency contact feature, someone who will give you access to your vault in the event that you forget your master password. I also like password managers that let you securely share passwords with multiple users. All password managers should notify you immediately if any of your passwords are compromised through security breach alerts. Finally, look for a password manager for two or even multi-factor authentication in the form of fingerprint or face ID. That’ll make sure the right person is accessing your accounts.

Extras

Those are the basics that you should expect from a password manager, but there are also a few extras to increase your web security even more. While none of these are entirely necessary, they certainly increase the value of a password manager.

Receipt Capture

dashlane-password-manager-review
Dashlane Receipt Capture. Photo provided by Dashlane.

Receipt capture will automatically (you guessed it) capture any receipts from online shopping and put them in a secure folder for you. This helps you keep track of your online purchases to make sure that your card information hasn’t been compromised.

Inbox Scan

dashlane-password-manager-review
Dashlane Inbox Scan. Photo provided by Dashlane.

Let’s be honest: we’ve all, at one point or another, emailed someone our username or password. But that was before I came into your life! Some password managers will go through your email’s inbox, scanning for your credentials. If they find any, you’ll be alerted and can change your password ASAP.

Dark Web Scan

1password-password-manager-review
1Password Dark Web Scan

The dark web is an anonymous part of the Internet only accessible by special software. Making up about six percent of the Internet’s total, the dark web is a hotbed of cybercrime with millions of stolen passwords floating around every day. Many password managers will scan the dark web for your credentials, again, alerting you if they are found. Out of all the extra features I mention, dark web scan is by far the most common.

VPNs 

dashlane-password-manager-review
Dashlane VPN. Photo provided by Dashlane.

Want to encrypt your web traffic? You should consider using a VPN, which stands for Virtual Private Network. Now, Dashlane is the only password manager I’ve seen to offer a VPN, but it’s definitely a nice feature if you want to keep your traffic to yourself. For more information, read about the best VPNs of 2019. 

Credit Monitoring

dashlane-password-manager-review
Dashlane Credit Monitoring. Photo provided by Dashlane.

Some password managers will monitor your credit online, which makes it easy to see if you’ve been a victim of identity theft.

Identity Theft Insurance

dashlane-password-manager-review
Dashlane Identity Theft Insurance. Screenshot from Dashlane website.

Accordingly, some password managers offer identity theft insurance, but this is a rarity.

Travel Mode

1password-password-manager-review
1Password Travel Mode

Travel mode is a feature I’ve only seen with 1Password, but boy do I wish it was standard. It makes it so devices can be marked as “safe” or “unsafe” for travel, preventing customs from accessing your accounts.

Storage

I prefer password managers with unlimited storage both locally on your device and in a cloud. But this isn’t a dealbreaker, as one GB will probably be more than enough for most people.

Subscriptions

keeper-password-manager-review
Keeper Subscription Options- Personal
keeper-password-manager-review
Keeper Personal Subscription Pricing

Are you an individual or a family? Are you using your password manager for business or for personal use? These are just some of the questions you should ask yourself before picking a password manager. Some have family and business plans, usually paid in a monthly or yearly subscription. Password manager typically only cost a few dollars a month, and many even have free versions. Be sure to do a price comparison before you buy!

Customer Support

1password-password-manager-review
1Password Customer Support

I have to admit that when it comes to customer support, many password managers are seriously lacking. All have online forums, but I prefer to be able to speak to a human in some way, be it email, live chat, or the rarest, a phone line. After checking out what features a company’s customer support team offers, I make sure to check out their online reviews from Amazon and Google. Doing a search for reviews mentioning customer support specifically, you can get a good idea of how helpful they actually are. I prefer ratings above 3.5. If Amazon and Google ratings aren’t available, you can always check out Trustpilot.

App

1password-app-review
The 1Password App

Finally, there’s the password manager’s app. Of course, you should make sure it’s available on your devices. Then, I’d check the app’s ratings on either iPhone or Android, depending on what kind of smart phone you have. Make sure the ratings are at about 3.5 stars or higher, or else you’re going to run into some bugs.

That’s it from me! As always, let me know if you have any questions below. I’m happy to help!

Gabe Turner

Gabe Turner

Gabe Turner is an attorney and journalist with a passion for home tech and secure, efficient living. Since graduating from NYU Law, he has maintained a paradoxical existence of trying to live life adventurously while remaining staunchly risk-averse. He is torn by the dual desires of wanting to only be in Brooklyn writing about housing policy and smart home tech and aspiring to visit his friends scattered across the globe. Gabe believes that stable, safe communities are the cornerstone to a vibrant and healthy society, and it is this passion that brought him to contribute to Security Baron.

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